#BackOffIndia – Growing Concern Over the Nepal Fuel Crisis

[fusion_builder_container backgroundcolor=”” backgroundimage=”” backgroundrepeat=”no-repeat” backgroundposition=”left top” backgroundattachment=”scroll” video_webm=”” video_mp4=”” video_ogv=”” video_preview_image=”” overlay_color=”” overlay_opacity=”0.5″ video_mute=”yes” video_loop=”yes” fade=”no” bordersize=”0px” bordercolor=”” borderstyle=”solid” paddingtop=”1px” paddingbottom=”15px” paddingleft=”0px” paddingright=”0px” menu_anchor=”” equal_height_columns=”no” hundred_percent=”no” class=”” id=””][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none”][fusion_text]As ethnic groups bicker over constitutional wording, families in Nepal are growing desperate. The disagreements over the recently accepted constitution have caused the border between Nepal and India to be the site of protests, making it hard for people to get the fuel they need for transportation and cooking. The constitution, agreed to after a lengthy debate, has been contested by the Madheshi primarily, although other groups have also voiced their concerns. The Madhesi, a group that has been accused of having ties to India, have effectively shut down the border and prevented the importation of numerous necessities, including fuel and medical supplies. After stretching out for months, with the protests leaving nearly 50 dead, the impasse has reached the point of becoming a critical humanitarian issue.[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container][fusion_builder_container backgroundcolor=”” backgroundimage=”” backgroundrepeat=”no-repeat” backgroundposition=”left top” backgroundattachment=”scroll” video_webm=”” video_mp4=”” video_ogv=”” video_preview_image=”” overlay_color=”” overlay_opacity=”0.5″ video_mute=”yes” video_loop=”yes” fade=”no” bordersize=”0px” bordercolor=”” borderstyle=”solid” paddingtop=”1px” paddingbottom=”1px” paddingleft=”0px” paddingright=”0px” menu_anchor=”” equal_height_columns=”no” hundred_percent=”no” class=”” id=””][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_2″ last=”no” spacing=”yes” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]The Nepalese people have already faced great hardship in 2015, prior to the border concerns. The devastating earthquakes that occurred in the spring, wiped out existing medical supplies. This shortage, coupled with the lack of fuel and medical supplies entering the country, has forced hospitals to delay necessary surgeries and is preventing many from getting the health care they desperately need.

[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_2″ last=”yes” spacing=”yes” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_imageframe lightbox=”no” style_type=”bottomshadow” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”fade” animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.7″ class=”” id=””] [/fusion_imageframe][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container][fusion_builder_container backgroundcolor=”” backgroundimage=”” backgroundrepeat=”no-repeat” backgroundposition=”left top” backgroundattachment=”scroll” video_webm=”” video_mp4=”” video_ogv=”” video_preview_image=”” overlay_color=”” overlay_opacity=”0.5″ video_mute=”yes” video_loop=”yes” fade=”no” bordersize=”0px” bordercolor=”” borderstyle=”solid” paddingtop=”px” paddingbottom=”px” paddingleft=”1px” paddingright=”1px” menu_anchor=”” equal_height_columns=”no” hundred_percent=”no” class=”” id=””][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none”][fusion_text]Schools have remained closed, restaurants are limited in what they can offer and as many as 800,000 residents are teetering on the edge of what is being deemed as “extreme poverty”. A great number of the victims of the earthquakes have been unable to rebuild, and are living outside, exposed to increasingly poor weather conditions. All of this is making it difficult for the country, and its residents, to survive basic daily life.

With the lack of necessary nutrition, the constant exposure to the elements and the inability to have even the most basic drugs like antibiotics, the most at risk are the children of Nepal. Over three million children, under the age of 5, are now considered to be at risk of dying or contracting what would have been an otherwise preventable disease.

India has denied that the claims of them restricting goods to Nepal are incorrect, despite their close ties with the Madhesi people. Sushma Swaraj, India’s Minister of External Affairs, has stated that there is no blockade of goods on the part of India. He insists is that any problems with shortages are from the internal issues within Nepal and, as he explained to the Deputy Minister of Nepal, is something they would need to manage for themselves.[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container][fusion_builder_container backgroundcolor=”” backgroundimage=”” backgroundrepeat=”no-repeat” backgroundposition=”left top” backgroundattachment=”scroll” video_webm=”” video_mp4=”” video_ogv=”” video_preview_image=”” overlay_color=”” overlay_opacity=”0.5″ video_mute=”yes” video_loop=”yes” fade=”no” bordersize=”0px” bordercolor=”” borderstyle=”” paddingtop=”20px” paddingbottom=”20px” paddingleft=”0px” paddingright=”0px” menu_anchor=”” equal_height_columns=”no” hundred_percent=”no” class=”” id=””][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_2″ last=”no” spacing=”yes” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_code]

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The blockade by India to Nepal is still going 5 months after the first day of…

Posted by Jenn Mathews on Wednesday, December 9, 2015

[/fusion_code][/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_2″ last=”yes” spacing=”yes” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]Currently, only 40 percent of the nation’s students are in school, foreign aid from countries like the United States is impossible to utilize and there have been no signs of any potential agreements over the constitutional issues. The Madhesi are refusing to honor a system they feel does not represent them properly, and the Nepalese government has offered no concessions.

I have been home for 3 weeks now and have asked my friends that are still in Nepal how I can help with the fuel crisis. Their response has repeatedly been to encourage people to visit Nepal. The country’s economy thrives off of tourism and people flock to climb Mount Everest and hike on popular treks like the Annapurna Circuit. Outdoor activities such as Paragliding and Kayaking are also popular in addition to Yoga being favored among many visitors. If you are looking to help Nepal it’s easy to do from where you are sitting now. Just share the post I have made personally, or create one of your own on Facebook letting people know how amazing Nepal is. If you have the time and money, you can take it a step further and visit Nepal yourself. I am personally planning a trip this upcoming March through May 2016 and plan on staying in the Hidden Paradise Guest House Hotel that overlooks Pokhara’s beautiful Phewa Lake. The hotel is very affordable and my favorite place to stay as they have western toilets, hot showers, wifi, laundry service and serve meals upon request. Not to mention they are just a 30 minute walk from Pokhara’s Lakeside full of quaint little shops and amazing restaurants.

I hope to hear that you will be visiting, and at the very least hearing that you have let all of your friends know how amazing and special Nepal is.[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]